United States Congress

Description

The legislative powers of the United States are vested in the Congress of the United States, which consists of the Senate and the House of the Representatives.
The first meeting of each regular session of the Senate and House of Representatives is held at noon on the third day of January, unless they shall by law fix a different date.
Each House determines the rules of its proceedings, is the judge of the qualifications of its own members, and may punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, by a two-thirds vote, expel a member.
Vacancies in the Senate may, if empowered by the legislature, be filled by the Governor of the State from which the Senator whose place is to be filled was chosen, such appointment to remain in force until the vacancy is filled by a special election, or, if no special election is held, until the next general election.
In New York State any vacancy of U.S. Senator from the State occurring in an even-numbered calendar year on or after the 59th day prior to an annual primary election is filled by the Governor until Jan. 3 in the year following the next even-numbered calendar year. If the vacancy occurs in an even-numbered calendar year on or before the 60th day prior to an annual primary election, such vacancy is filled by the Governor until Jan. 3 in the next calendar year. If the vacancy occurs in an odd-numbered calendar year such vacancy is filled by the Governor until Jan. 3 in the next odd-numbered calendar year. At the general election next preceding the date when appointment by the Governor expires, the vacancy is filled for remainder of the unexpired term.
Vacancies in the House of Representatives may be filled only by an election for the unexpired term. A special election shall not be held unless such vacancy occurs on or before July 1 of the last year of the term, or unless it occurs thereafter and a special session of Congress is called to meet before the next general election, or be called after Sept. 19 of such year.

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